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Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment

Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment explores the connection between art and life. It links Indigenous values, such as our connection to water and our protection of Mother Earth, to artistic representations. In this lesson, Sara Leah Hindy, a Mi’kmaw teacher, introduces the significance of place and explores textures in one of her […]

Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment explores the connection between art and life. It links Indigenous values, such as our connection to water and our protection of Mother Earth, to artistic representations. In this lesson, Sara Leah Hindy, a Mi’kmaw teacher, introduces the significance of place and explores textures in one of her favourite places, the beach. Using a rock collected on the beach, Marcus Gosse, a Mi’kmaw artist, then guides students on an artistic journey that weaves together a story of people and place through petroglyph-inspired rock art. Following the lesson, students are encouraged to explore their own special places and create a story that they would like to share through an art piece, uniquely theirs.

The complete lesson, Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment, can be found in NCCIE’s Teaching Resource Centre at https://www.nccie.ca.

Délina Petit Pas, Chair and Director, Mi’kmaw Language and Culture Programs, Mi’kmaw Heritage Research and Restoration Association

Délina Petit Pas is the Chair and Director of the Mi’kmaw Language and Culture Programs with the Mi’kmaw Heritage Research and Restoration Association (MHRRA), which is a not-for-profit society based in Nova Scotia.  In the interview, she describes the culture and language revitalization camps and classes offered by MHRRA in several Newfoundland communities. At the […]

Délina Petit Pas is the Chair and Director of the Mi’kmaw Language and Culture Programs with the Mi’kmaw Heritage Research and Restoration Association (MHRRA), which is a not-for-profit society based in Nova Scotia.  In the interview, she describes the culture and language revitalization camps and classes offered by MHRRA in several Newfoundland communities. At the camps, participants learn the basics of the Smith-Francis Mi’kmaw orthography and gain a deeper understanding of their language in relation to Mi’kmaw culture and traditions. Videos of esteemed Elders Bernie Francis and Curtis Michael at the camps can be found at http://vimeo.copm/channels/mhrra

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Audrey Benoit

Audrey Benoit, Vice-Principal of Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation describes how they celebrate and support Indigenous culture in their school. 

Audrey Benoit, Vice-Principal of Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation describes how they celebrate and support Indigenous culture in their school. 

Creating Cultural Space for Change

Lonny is Traditional Knowledge Holder working to fill in what were cultural blank spaces with Indigenous dialogue and narrative to create a meaningful cultural support to the clients and staff of the Rotary House. Lonny discusses how important it is to create cultural space for not only clients but also for front line workers dealing […]

Lonny is Traditional Knowledge Holder working to fill in what were cultural blank spaces with Indigenous dialogue and narrative to create a meaningful cultural support to the clients and staff of the Rotary House. Lonny discusses how important it is to create cultural space for not only clients but also for front line workers dealing in the field of mental health. Cultural space is necessary for people to experience what is meaningful for them and to start healing steps. He shares the five components required for Indigenous Education to be truly culturally based and grounded. 

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Kayla Stride

Kayla Stride, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, and member of Eastern Owl, describes how she uses drumming and song to re-ignite youth’s interest in their culture and strengthen Indigenous identity.  

Kayla Stride, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, and member of Eastern Owl, describes how she uses drumming and song to re-ignite youth’s interest in their culture and strengthen Indigenous identity.

 

Angela Grandjambe

Angela sits on many different boards. She sits as the DEA for many years. Angela holds knowledge of our community that benefits our people.

Angela sits on many different boards. She sits as the DEA for many years. Angela holds knowledge of our community that benefits our people.

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Marilyn John

Marilyn John, a math tutor at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom, in Miawpukek First Nation, describes her work with students in grades 7,8 and 9. She talks about the community’s loss of language and the challenges of reviving Mi’Kmaw 80 years later. She concludes by advocating for the reintroduction of traditional crafts.   

Marilyn John, a math tutor at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom, in Miawpukek First Nation, describes her work with students in grades 7,8 and 9. She talks about the community’s loss of language and the challenges of reviving Mi’Kmaw 80 years later. She concludes by advocating for the reintroduction of traditional crafts. 

 

An Interview with Mary Jane Joe

In this interview, Mary Jane Joe shares her vision for Indigenous education. She explains the importance of future generations maintaining the knowledge of their elders and to keep their traditions alive. Mary Jane Joe is a knowledge keeper and Elder-in Residence at Langara College in Vancouver, BC.

In this interview, Mary Jane Joe shares her vision for Indigenous education. She explains the importance of future generations maintaining the knowledge of their elders and to keep their traditions alive.

Mary Jane Joe is a knowledge keeper and Elder-in Residence at Langara College in Vancouver, BC.

Community Elder Perspective – Albina Cardinal

As a Community Elder, she thinks Indigenous Educators are making progress in bringing in Indigenous history and infuses it in the curriculum for students is part of the process for healing and understanding.

Albina Cardinal is a community elder and a residential school survivor and enjoys the opportunity to present first hand experience of attending residential school to students and teachers She presents to students at the Kindergarten – Grade 3 level to discuss her past experience of residential school. She enjoys interacting with the students which is also a great experience for her. Mrs. Cardinal has been invited to present to teachers on Professional Development days which are held at the school in High Level to talk and answer questions of being a residential school survivor. This provides Educators another means of passing on to their students about what attending a residential school was like as part of the Indigenous peoples history. She explains the relevance of presenting first hand experience since it is easier to listen to a person rather than reading a book as another means to learning. Mrs. Cardinal feels that it is important to learn of Indigenous history and language and work towards bringing back Indigenous languages. She shared a story of when she was young and the many things she learned from her parents when she was home in the summer, fall and sometimes winter. She fondly remembers her mom making her brothers and sisters a pair of moccasins to wear at residential school when they had to return.

Indigenous Teacher Perspective – Penny Cardinal-Kotash

Audio interview with Indigenous Educator Penny Cardinal-Kotash perspective from Treaty 8, High Level, Alberta.

Penny Cardinal-Kotash is a Indigenous Teacher who teaches in High Level, Alberta. She is passionate about teaching students and infuses Indigenous education throughout the Language Arts, Social Studies, and Math curriculum. She utilizes her own experience to help students learn about the Cree culture but of other Indigenous cultures. Mrs. Kotash explains that Indigenous students need to see themselves in everyday society, to learn that Indigenous peoples have always been here, and to learn about their own culture and others in which each are a part of Canada’s fabric. She helps other Educators in the Division and encourages them to choose and identify where the literature originates from, as well as the region they belong to, to ensure it’s relevancy for their region. Penny Cardinal-Kotash is part of the Division’s FNMI cohort and provides resources, and support to understand we are not all the same culture and to base their teachings relative to the language and its region.