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Dancing Circles: Strong Hoop, Strong Spirit

Bringing hoop dancing to life through an instructional video.

The video, Dancing Circles: Strong Hoop, Strong Spirit (2003), is a Cree/English Instructional Resource on Hoop Dancing. The Hoop Dance is the accompanying Teacher Resource and both are aligned with Saskatchewan Learning curriculum. These resources are shared with permission from the writer, Anna-Leah King, Division Tech Media at the University of Saskatchewan, and the Greater Saskatoon Catholic School Division.

Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Teresa McGregor – Anishnawbek Ways of Knowing

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

Think Indigenous – An Initiative Supporting Indigenous Knowledge

The Think Indigenous initiative inspires educators to think about education through an Indigenous knowledge lens.

Chris Scribe is the Executive Director and Board Chair of Think Indigenous, an initiative that seeks to support programs, innovations, and education that focus on Indigenous knowledge. Scribe believes that Indigenous knowledge is “an embodiment of life, it’s all levels of understanding relative to the area in which we live.” Scribe explains that what is needed now is for Indigenous people to create curriculums based on Indigenous knowledge that can be used within our education system. We need to invite our Knowledge Keepers into our classrooms so that traditional  knowledge is valued and honoured. As well, leaders in education need to make room for educators to try Indigenous methods and approaches to learning.

Creating Cultural Space for Change

Lonny is Traditional Knowledge Holder working to fill in what were cultural blank spaces with Indigenous dialogue and narrative to create a meaningful cultural support to the clients and staff of the Rotary House. Lonny discusses how important it is to create cultural space for not only clients but also for front line workers dealing […]

Lonny is Traditional Knowledge Holder working to fill in what were cultural blank spaces with Indigenous dialogue and narrative to create a meaningful cultural support to the clients and staff of the Rotary House. Lonny discusses how important it is to create cultural space for not only clients but also for front line workers dealing in the field of mental health. Cultural space is necessary for people to experience what is meaningful for them and to start healing steps. He shares the five components required for Indigenous Education to be truly culturally based and grounded. 

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Susep Soulle – Knowledge holder – Secwepemc language speaker

Only 18 years old, Susep is considered to be one of the youngest fluent speakers of his traditional language.

This interview is done with one of the youngest fluent speakers of the Secwepemc language. He is from the small town of Chase, BC. Susep is an assistant teacher at the renowned “Chief Atahm” school which is located on the Adams Lake Band. Only 18 years old Susep takes us on his short journey of his life and shares with us some of his thoughts on language, language revitalization and culture.

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

Jocelyn Formsma – Student of Life

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.