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Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

E. Bob – Anishnawbek Wellness Teachings and Ceremony in Support of Inmates

Shared experiences when culture is used to advance corrections intentions. Here we see in what ways life is improved in a corrections environment. Ceremonies, smudging, sharing circles are all a part of sessions where

Program that is provided is for the inmate populations, it helps to provide life skills and coping strategies using Anishinawbek ways. “To have a better understanding of traditional knowledge.” Using circles as a teaching model, smudge to get ready for ceremony as well as a community pipe. Through group sharing, it provides the inmates with a safe place to talk about themselves and a break from being stuck in a incarceration setting.

Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home

Learning nēhiyawēwin through language acquisition methods that have informed the success of Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home, a program designed by Belinda Daniels and offered through READ Saskatoon. 

Belinda Daniels, onikanew (she who leads), runs a program through READ Saskatoon called, Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home. The program was born from the idea of learning language in a natural setting by enjoying food at the kitchen table, intergenerationally, with family members. The nēhiyawēwin (Cree) language classes are offered to anyone who wants to learn nēhiyawēwin in Saskatoon and encourages learners of all ages.

Language learners come to the class in a good way by introducing and positioning themselves in the community. The group offers tobacco to the language spirit and follows protocol by saying a prayer and smudging at the beginning of class. By learning Cree around the kitchen table, learners are able to learn food terminology in a coincidental way. Some terms and vocabulary include learning how to ask and say: Are you hungry?; I am hungry; What is this?; this is good; I would like some more; soup, bannock, pop, juice, milk, salad, pizza, etc.

In the classes, Daniels employs three language learning methods which are the direct method, task-based learning, and accelerated second language acquisition. Daniels hopes that her students become intrinsically motivated to bring language home and pass it on to the next generation of nēhiyawēwin language learners. By reclaiming language we work to restore identity, nationhood, and make gains towards sovereignty and self-determination.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.

Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Inuit educational and cultural institution

Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for “a place and time to become wise”), dedicated to providing Inuit youth with unique cultural and academic learning experiences that will allow them to develop the knowledge, skills and positive attitudes needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, the school gives urban Inuit a place to learn and prepare for other post-secondary or professional opportunities.

Nunavut Arctic College – Environmental Technology Program: An Adventure in Learning

The Environmental Technology Program through Nunavut Arctic College emphasizes how systems work in the environment through different methods on the land and in the classroom. It hopes to teach Inuit about their land, how ecosystems work and how governments work together to manage it. It is a post-secondary program that includes on the land training. For more information you can visit the Nunavut Arctic College website.

The Environmental Technology Program through Nunavut Arctic College emphasizes how systems work in the environment through different methods on the land and in the classroom. It hopes to teach Inuit about their land, how ecosystems work and how governments work together to manage it. It is a post-secondary program that includes on the land training. For more information you can visit the Nunavut Arctic College website.

Long ago Peoples Place

Yukon First Nation History and knowledge

Harold Johnson talks about the Long Ago Peoples Place near Champagne Village, Yukon. The Long Ago peoples Place is a living museum of how Yukon First Nations people used to live and survive in the Yukon. The walk through meseum facility highlights a time line of what life was like back in the early years all the way to present times. Such as what those early Yukon First Nation people used to live in and their means of hunting with tools and weapons. The walk through museum facility is a way to learn, engage, heal, pass on, and revitalize Yukon First Nation ways of life culture and traditions.

Tłı̨chǫ Government

John B Zoe, Senior Advisor with the Tłı̨chǫ Government, talks about the importance of Tłı̨chǫ traditional knowledge, Land, Language and Culture. John also sits as the Chairperson of Dedats’eetsaa: the Tłı̨chǫ Research & Training Institute.

John B Zoe, Senior Advisor with the Tłı̨chǫ Government, talks about the importance of Tłı̨chǫ traditional knowledge, Land, Language and Culture. John also sits as the Chairperson of Dedats’eetsaa: the Tłı̨chǫ Research & Training Institute.

Executive Director of Niagara Regional Native Centre (NRNC) – Walking in Two Worlds

Chris Shawanoo speaks about the role of the Niagara Regional Native Centre (NRNC) in providing holistic educational opportunities to the Niagara Region urban Indigenous community. He also speaks about NRNC’s partnership with the Catholic District School Board to start up Soaring Eagles Indigenous school as a response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s “Calls to Action”. Chris uses personal stories and teachings throughout this talk to illustrate the wholistic education model of NRNC’s womb to grave services and to answer questions about Indigenous education.

Chris Shawanoo speaks about the wholistic programming provided by NRNC to urban Indigenous community members as well as the start of the Indigenous school Soaring Eagles. Chris uses personal stories and passes down teachings given to him to illustrate the importance of a wholistic education and a western education. Walking in two worlds involves cultural revitalization to ground an individual to a strong identity while providing culturally sensitive educational opportunities to combat systemic oppression, colonization, and poverty. Recognition is given to the importance of a non-western education as well as the importance of language revitalization.

All Canadians Can Gain Knowledge of the Truth of Indigenous History and Reality

Darlene Horseman is a professor at the Grande Prairie Regional College. She shares her perspective of the post secondary education system and process from her experience as a student to a professor. She speaks of what was taught in Indigenous studies and how it has changed from very vague information to very concise.

Darlene Horseman is a professor at the Grande Prairie Regional College. She shares her perspective of the post secondary education system and process from her experience as a student to a professor. She speaks of what was taught in Indigenous studies and how it has changed from very vague information to very concise.