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Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

kâniyâsihk Culture Camps at Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation

Founder of kâniyâsihk Culture Camps, Kevin Lewis believes that land-based education is an important way for Cree and non-Indigenous people to (re)connect with Cree culture and identity.

Within the last two decades the kâniyâsihk Culture Camps at Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation have evolved from providing fall culture camps where participants took part in fishing and hide tanning to offering camps throughout all seasons and to anyone who wants to learn nehiyo (Cree) culture. Founder, Kevin Lewis explains that at kâniyâsihk Culture Camps participants take part in land-based learning that involves connecting with Elders, knowledge keepers, land keepers, medicine keepers, and berry pickers in their community. By sharing this wealth of knowledge with participants they begin to learn how to be self-sufficient and independent. Some of the many things done at camp include: learning Cree; harvesting plants for medicines; fishing and snaring; hide tanning; preserving moose, deer, elk, and fish; woodworking and building dog sleds, toboggans, birch bark canoes, snowshoes, and paddles; dog sledding; and participating in the Sun Dance, Sweat Lodge, and Chicken Dance ceremonies. Camp offers an immersive experience in nehiyo culture and Lewis hopes that more culture camps become available to people, especially for those living in urban areas.

Check out the kâniyâsihk Culture Camps website: https://kaniyasihkculturecamps.com.

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

Fort Good Hope Fish Camp – the Importance of Camp

This is one in a set of three videos that talk about life along the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River) and learning to fish.

Passing on knowledge to the next generation about living in ‘the bush’, learning how to camp and how to fish, is important to the Sahtu people of the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River). The people in this video talk about what it means to them to be able to spend time together away from town and for the grandparents to be able to teach their children and grandchildren how to make camp, catch and dry fish, and more. As Judy Lafferty says, “They have to learn for survival . . . It’s our place to teach them, as parents and grandparents.”

Special thanks to (in order of appearance):

  • Dennita Lafferty, Participant
  • Anna Turo, Participant
  • Judy Lafferty, Mentor
  • Wilma Manuel, Participant
  • Leon Turo, Mentor
  • Michel Lafferty, Mentor

As well, special thanks to:

  • Anne-Marie Jackson, NCCIE Videographer and Contributor
  • Christopher White, Promethean Heritage and Cultural Services, Video Editor
  • Andrée Cazabon, Productions Cazabon, Producer

This video and two others in this series are also part of ‘Tracking Change: the Role of Local and Traditional Knowledge in Watershed Governance’, a project that includes listening to Indigenous peoples along the Mackenzie, Mekong, and Amazon Rivers to gather information about “long term (historic and current) patterns of social and ecological change and the interconnections between the health and dynamics of these river systems and that of river communities.” (source: www.trackingchange.ca/about)

Luge k’e rahtse deh – “We live with the fish”

This is one in a set of three videos about life along the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River) in the Sahtu. This video is about learning the important life skill of fishing – how to fish and when and where to fish, knowledge that is passed down from one generation to another.

The people of K’asho Got’ine (Fort Good Hope) harvest fish from the Deh Cho (the Mackenzie River) and pass this knowledge on from generation to generation. Although fish-harvesting techniques have changed throughout colonization and amongst generations, some people still retain important practices that do not separate them from the land. Harvesters like Judy and Michel, the Elders in this video, are one of a few families who still practice land-based harvesting ‘out on the land’ in specific harvesting camps outside the community. One change in harvesting techniques that has become more common is harvesting within the community. With full time jobs and their children committed to education, it is difficult for those who harvest to go ‘out on the land’ for extended periods of time. Some find it more accessible to set nets close to the community and harvest outside their houses with teepees at their doorstep. Other inevitable changes to traditional harvesting techniques include adapting to non-traditional tools with the help of technology and modern materials. Amidst all of these changes in traditional harvesting practices and techniques, Judy and Michel, the Elder teachers, still emphasize the importance for them to remain each year harvesting fish ‘out on the land,’ hence – “Luge k’e rahtse deh, we live with the fish.”

Special thanks to (in order of appearance):

  • Wilma Manuel, Participant
  • Judy Lafferty, Mentor
  • Michel Lafferty, Mentor
  • Anna Turo, Participant

As well, special thanks to:

  • Anne-Marie Jackson, NCCIE Videographer and Contributor
  • Christopher White, Promethean Heritage and Cultural Services, Video Editor
  • Andrée Cazabon, Productions Cazabon, Producer

This video and two others in this series are also part of Tracking Change: the Role of Local and Traditional Knowledge in Watershed Governance (trackingchange.ca), a project that includes listening to Indigenous peoples along the Mackenzie, Mekong, and Amazon Rivers to gather information about “long term (historic and current) patterns of social and ecological change and the interconnections between the health and dynamics of these river systems and that of river communities.” (source: www.trackingchange.ca/about)

Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Inuit educational and cultural institution

Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for “a place and time to become wise”), dedicated to providing Inuit youth with unique cultural and academic learning experiences that will allow them to develop the knowledge, skills and positive attitudes needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, the school gives urban Inuit a place to learn and prepare for other post-secondary or professional opportunities.

Mary Jane Fraser – Teaching Culture, History and Music: The Story Knowledge of Creation

To teach culture, history and music. To have access to what could be considered a privilege offered at the library, pow-wow grounds, school settings and at the band office, throughout the year. All community members can access the programs, in and around the City of Greater Sudbury. Mary also offers translation services as well. Mary […]

To teach culture, history and music. To have access to what could be considered a privilege offered at the library, pow-wow grounds, school settings and at the band office, throughout the year. All community members can access the programs, in and around the City of Greater Sudbury. Mary also offers translation services as well. Mary has a four year project offering story knowledge of Creation in partnership with Sudbury Symphony Proponent for Native content in libraries. Where there is a designated section.

Nunavut Arctic College – Piqqusilirivvik – Baker Lake

Piqqusilirivvik is located in Clyde River with satellite programs in Baker Lake and Igloolik. Here, coordinator Silas Arngna’naaq talks about the different courses they offer in Baker Lake. Baker Lake is in the region of the caribou Inuit and is the only inland settlement in Nunavut. Silas talks about the variety of cultural skills that are taught within the program such as: traditional tool making, Iglu building, caribou skin preparation, fox trapping, caribou hunting, and fishing through the ice.

Piqqusilirivvik is the cultural education centre that delivers various courses about Inuit culture to community members. The centre is located in Clyde River with satellite programs in Baker Lake and Igloolik. Here, coordinator Silas Arngna’naaq talks about the different courses they offer in Baker Lake. Baker Lake is in the region of the caribou Inuit and is the only inland settlement in Nunavut. Silas talks about the variety of cultural skills that are taught within the program such as: traditional tool making, Iglu building, caribou skin preparation, fox trapping, caribou hunting, and fishing through the ice.

“Siyamtelot and Swelimeltexw” Hearing from our Elders

Siyamtelot is Okanagan and registered Stó:lō by marriage. Swelimeltexw is Stó:lō from Stsálles are Elders from Okanagan. They share their educational experience along with stories and teachings.

Siyamtelot is Okanagan and registered Stó:lō by marriage. Swelimeltexw is Stó:lō from Stsálles are Elders from Okanagan. They share their educational experience along with stories and teachings.