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Jocelyn Formsma – Student of Life

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

E. Bob – Anishnawbek Wellness Teachings and Ceremony in Support of Inmates

This program utilizes traditional knowledge and ceremony to advance the intentions of corrections institutions.

This program offers inmate populations an opportunity to learn life skills and coping strategies through Anishinawbek wellness teachings and ceremony. The program hopes that inmates will have a better understanding of traditional knowledge as they practice sharing in circles, smudge to get ready for ceremony, as well as, engaging in a community pipe. Group sharing provides the inmates with a safe place to talk about themselves and offers a break from being stuck in an incarceration setting.

Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey – John Jerome Paul

John Jerome Paul discusses his work with Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey and his nearly 50 years working in Indigenous education.

John Jerome Paul discusses his work with Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey and his nearly 50 years working in Indigenous education.

Fort Good Hope Fish Camp – the Importance of Camp

This is one in a set of three videos that talk about life along the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River) and learning to fish.

Passing on knowledge to the next generation about living in ‘the bush’, learning how to camp and how to fish, is important to the Sahtu people of the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River). The people in this video talk about what it means to them to be able to spend time together away from town and for the grandparents to be able to teach their children and grandchildren how to make camp, catch and dry fish, and more. As Judy Lafferty says, “They have to learn for survival . . . It’s our place to teach them, as parents and grandparents.”

Special thanks to (in order of appearance):

  • Dennita Lafferty, Participant
  • Anna Turo, Participant
  • Judy Lafferty, Mentor
  • Wilma Manuel, Participant
  • Leon Turo, Mentor
  • Michel Lafferty, Mentor

As well, special thanks to:

  • Anne-Marie Jackson, NCCIE Videographer and Contributor
  • Christopher White, Promethean Heritage and Cultural Services, Video Editor
  • Andrée Cazabon, Productions Cazabon, Producer

This video and two others in this series are also part of ‘Tracking Change: the Role of Local and Traditional Knowledge in Watershed Governance’, a project that includes listening to Indigenous peoples along the Mackenzie, Mekong, and Amazon Rivers to gather information about “long term (historic and current) patterns of social and ecological change and the interconnections between the health and dynamics of these river systems and that of river communities.” (source: www.trackingchange.ca/about)

Round Table on Indigenous Student’s experiences in Post-Secondary education

A round table involving five Indigenous students was held at Trent University to discuss their experiences within post-secondary education. The students offered insights into the challenges getting to university and working within the post-secondary system for Indigenous youth. Some of the themes that emerged from the discussion included, the difficulties deciding on a discipline, the […]

A round table involving five Indigenous students was held at Trent University to discuss their experiences within post-secondary education. The students offered insights into the challenges getting to university and working within the post-secondary system for Indigenous youth. Some of the themes that emerged from the discussion included, the difficulties deciding on a discipline, the challenges in being admitted to post-secondary studies, the significance of a mentor and support within the university setting, and the importance of learning about culture and strengthening identity during their post-secondary educational experience.

The members of the round table were
• Bobby Henry, Haudenosaunee
• Papatsi Kotierk, Inuit
• Thomas Morningstar, Anishinaabeg
• Amy Shawanda , Anishiaabeg
• Coty Zachariah, Haudenosaunee
• Gabriel Maracle, Haudenosaunee (Moderator)

Special thanks to Aye Min Latt, Videographer.

Qaggiavuut Nunavut Performing Arts

Qaggiavuut is a Nunavut based non-profit organization that delivers performing arts training and produces Inuit performing arts aimed at decolonizing and teaching Inuit traditional values.

Qaggiavuut is a non-profit organization that aims to strengthen and advocate for Nunavut’s performing artists through professional arts training. They offer a variety of training programs, produce professional performances, and collaborate with other organizations to deliver programs. They are focused on creating arts partnerships, arts education, creating Inuit performing arts work, and developing an Inuit performing arts pedagogy. The objectives of their programs are to decolonize and teach Inuit traditional values through performing arts. Since April 2016 they have delivered programming to support more than 300 Inuit performing artists and 5000 Nunavut children and youth.

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – Kyle Simon

Kyle Simon, a student at Annapolis Valley First Nation School, discusses the ways in which the school has helped him succeed.

Kyle Simon, a student at Annapolis Valley First Nation School, discusses the ways in which the school has helped him succeed.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.

Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Inuit educational and cultural institution

Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for “a place and time to become wise”), dedicated to providing Inuit youth with unique cultural and academic learning experiences that will allow them to develop the knowledge, skills and positive attitudes needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, the school gives urban Inuit a place to learn and prepare for other post-secondary or professional opportunities. 

To learn more, visit: https://www.nunavutsivuniksavut.ca/about-us.

Lizz Nootchtai – Land Based Healing

Land based healing models, teaching culture and Anishnawbek knowledge, worldview, ways of being, ceremony. This program is offered on demand, Lizz makes herself available because this is her role and responsibility.

Land based healing models, teaching culture and Anishnawbek knowledge, worldview, ways of being, ceremony. This program is offered on demand, Lizz makes herself available because this is her role and responsibility.