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Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Teresa McGregor – Anishnawbek Ways of Knowing

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

Délina Petit Pas, Chair and Director, Mi’kmaw Language and Culture Programs, Mi’kmaw Heritage Research and Restoration Association

Délina Petit Pas is the Chair and Director of the Mi’kmaw Language and Culture Programs with the Mi’kmaw Heritage Research and Restoration Association (MHRRA), which is a not-for-profit society based in Nova Scotia.  In the interview, she describes the culture and language revitalization camps and classes offered by MHRRA in several Newfoundland communities. At the […]

Délina Petit Pas is the Chair and Director of the Mi’kmaw Language and Culture Programs with the Mi’kmaw Heritage Research and Restoration Association (MHRRA), which is a not-for-profit society based in Nova Scotia.  In the interview, she describes the culture and language revitalization camps and classes offered by MHRRA in several Newfoundland communities. At the camps, participants learn the basics of the Smith-Francis Mi’kmaw orthography and gain a deeper understanding of their language in relation to Mi’kmaw culture and traditions. Videos of esteemed Elders Bernie Francis and Curtis Michael at the camps can be found at http://vimeo.copm/channels/mhrra

Making Cree Resources and Traditional Stories Accessible

Solomon Ratt is an educator who has dedicated his life to teaching, while also creating and translating resources into Cree.

Solomon Ratt is an Associate Professor of Indigenous Languages at First Nations University of Canada. Ratt has been teaching Cree and creating Cree language learning and teaching resources since the 1970’s. He says, growing up there was no access to Indigenous literature and now, because of some key players like Freda Ahenikew and the Saskatchewan Indigenous Cultural Centre (SICC), there has been significant progress in writing both traditional stories and other stories in Cree. Despite what some people say about writing and sharing traditional Cree stories in written form, Ratt believes in order for the language to survive we need to be able to write our stories in our languages so that they are available for the next generation. More and more of our people are isolated without a community of mentors who will teach us the language – writing it and creating ways online for people to access it is crucial to its survival and the survival of our cultures. Ratt suggests a number of resources that are effective in language learning and most of them are accessible through SICC.

Resources: 

SayITFirst Books

Cree Literacy Network

Saskatchewan Indigenous Cultural Centre

Dr. Brock Pitawanakwat – Nation-specific models of education

Developing models for nation-specific education through language revitalization and community engagement.

Developing models for nation-specific education through language revitalization and community engagement.

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

Jocelyn Formsma – Student of Life

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.