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Harvest Days at Sturgeon Lake First Nation

Sturgeon Lake First Nation community members reflecting on Harvest Days during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Harvest Days is an example of what is possible – community members came together at the Healing Lodge, over the course of a week, and between young and old, they hunted, fished, picked berries, processed food, prepared medicines and drank pandemic immunity. Their efforts to support their community during a pandemic and their commitment to teaching the youth about land-based learning, community, and traditional health is shown in their food security preparations.

*Disclaimer: this video deals wth the processing of deer, moose, and fish for preservation and has graphic content. 

Embracing Indigenous Spirituality

Indigenous scholar, Dr. Blair Stonechild, discusses Indigenous spirituality in his recent publications.

Dr. Blair Stonechild is from Muscowpetung Saulteaux Nation and is a professor of Indigenous Studies at First Nations University of Canada. After years of research and a keen interest in Indigenous spirituality and has written two books: The Knowledge Seeker – Embracing Indigenous Spirituality (2016) and Loss of Indigenous Eden and the Fall of Spirituality (2020). These two books have contributed to exposing how Indigenous spirituality has been systematically stolen from Indigenous peoples and helps to establish some of the principles of understanding Indigenous spirituality. Stonechild explains, “if you ever hope to understand Indigenous spirituality you have to understand that we are spiritual beings on a physical journey.”

Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

E. Bob – Anishnawbek Wellness Teachings and Ceremony in Support of Inmates

This program utilizes traditional knowledge and ceremony to advance the intentions of corrections institutions.

This program offers inmate populations an opportunity to learn life skills and coping strategies through Anishinawbek wellness teachings and ceremony. The program hopes that inmates will have a better understanding of traditional knowledge as they practice sharing in circles, smudge to get ready for ceremony, as well as, engaging in a community pipe. Group sharing provides the inmates with a safe place to talk about themselves and offers a break from being stuck in an incarceration setting.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation

4 Seasons of Reconciliation is a multi-media teaching unit that promotes a renewed relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canadians.

This educational initiative, developed for secondary, post-secondary and the workplace, incorporates teacher guides, slideshows, videos and films along with engaging online portals.

The reconciliation education resources are produced under the guidance of the ‘4 Seasons of Reconciliation Indigenous Advisory Circle.’  We work in a spirit of collaboration and co-creation with the Indigenous contributors featured throughout our resources and education units.

This resource is available for professional development use and educational purposes in workplaces and education sectors and aims to assist in meetings some of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action.

For more information, please visit: https://www.reconciliationeducation.ca/.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation was produced by Productions Cazabon in collaboration with First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv) and with support from FNUniv, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, and the National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.

Qikiqtani Inuit Association

The Qikiqtani Inuit Association communicates with the communities in the Qikiqtani region of Nunavut to mentor them in designing Inuit, cultural youth programs.

The Qikiqtani Inuit Association helps Inuit define their identity along with providing authentic Inuit cultural activities. The organization also helps Inuit reconcile with certain groups that colonized them.

“Siyamtelot and Swelimeltexw” Hearing from our Elders

Siyamtelot is Okanagan and registered Stó:lō by marriage. Swelimeltexw is Stó:lō from Stsálles are Elders from Okanagan. They share their educational experience along with stories and teachings.

Siyamtelot is Okanagan and registered Stó:lō by marriage. Swelimeltexw is Stó:lō from Stsálles are Elders from Okanagan. They share their educational experience along with stories and teachings.

Long ago Peoples Place

Yukon First Nation History and knowledge

Harold Johnson talks about the Long Ago Peoples Place near Champagne Village, Yukon. The Long Ago peoples Place is a living museum of how Yukon First Nations people used to live and survive in the Yukon. The walk through meseum facility highlights a time line of what life was like back in the early years all the way to present times. Such as what those early Yukon First Nation people used to live in and their means of hunting with tools and weapons. The walk through museum facility is a way to learn, engage, heal, pass on, and revitalize Yukon First Nation ways of life culture and traditions.