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Language Retention a Priority for Saskatchewan Indigenous Cultural Centre

Since 1972, SICC has been protecting, preserving, and promoting First Nations languages.

Priscilla St. John is the Education and Language Specialist for the Saskatchewan Indian Cultural Center (SICC). As the first Indigenous controlled education institution serving Saskatchewan, SICC offers opportunities for cultural revitalization for the following First Nations: Plains Cree, Swampy Cree, Woodlands Cree, Dene, Saulteaux, Dakota, Nakota and Lakota. First Nations Elders met to discuss the importance of Indigenous language acquisition and developed outcomes that, combined with the provincially mandated curriculum, create the language based curriculum that SICC promotes. St. John explains, First Nations languages start with our ways of knowing, our stories, our ancestors, our laws, our protocols, and are guided by Elders, which are all connected to the Creator. SICC provides First Nations with educational resources and language workshops that derive from their land based and sacred language curricula. These opportunities and resources are available to anyone who is interested in language revitalization.

Master-Apprentice Indigenous language revitalization in Michif and Other Indigenous Languages

Prairies to Woodlands Indigenous Language Revitalization Circle Master-Apprentice Indigenous language revitalization aims to build the capacity of fluent-speaking Elders and others (“masters”) and committed learners (“apprentices”) to work as language learning teams in hopes of keeping their endangered ancestral languages alive. P2WILRC, a grassroots all-volunteer community group based in the Parkland, was given a grant […]

Prairies to Woodlands Indigenous Language Revitalization Circle Master-Apprentice Indigenous language revitalization aims to build the capacity of fluent-speaking Elders and others (“masters”) and committed learners (“apprentices”) to work as language learning teams in hopes of keeping their endangered ancestral languages alive. P2WILRC, a grassroots all-volunteer community group based in the Parkland, was given a grant from Canadian Heritage’s Aboriginal Language Initiative to run the MAP pilot project. At the time of this interview, there are five funded Master-Apprentice Program (MAP) teams—three Michif, one Swampy Cree, and one Ojibwe who will work for upwards of 300 hours together by March 31, 2019.