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Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Land-based science and culture camp- Holly Burke

Youth participant, Holly Burke, talks about the land-based youth camp at Killdevil Mountain in Grose Morne National Park. The science and culture camp is facilitated by Qalipu First Nation. 

Youth participant, Holly Burke, talks about the land-based youth camp at Killdevil Mountain in Grose Morne National Park. The science and culture camp is facilitated by Qalipu First Nation. 

School of Trades and Technology – TRU

TRU offers a variety of programs develop and delivered with Indigenous people. The School of Trades & Technology hosts many degrees and programs including Building Capacity & Community Through Construction Trades and Waste & Wastewater Treatment certificates which demonstrates TRU’s ongoing commitment to Indigenous education through meaningful and responsive programming development and delivery.

TRU offers a variety of programs develop and delivered with Indigenous people. The School of Trades & Technology hosts many degrees and programs including Building Capacity & Community Through Construction Trades and Waste & Wastewater Treatment certificates which demonstrates TRU’s ongoing commitment to Indigenous education through meaningful and responsive programming development and delivery.

kâniyâsihk Culture Camps at Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation

Founder of kâniyâsihk Culture Camps, Kevin Lewis believes that land-based education is an important way for Cree and non-Indigenous people to (re)connect with Cree culture and identity.

Within the last two decades the kâniyâsihk Culture Camps at Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation have evolved from providing fall culture camps where participants took part in fishing and hide tanning to offering camps throughout all seasons and to anyone who wants to learn nehiyo (Cree) culture. Founder, Kevin Lewis explains that at kâniyâsihk Culture Camps participants take part in land-based learning that involves connecting with Elders, knowledge keepers, land keepers, medicine keepers, and berry pickers in their community. By sharing this wealth of knowledge with participants they begin to learn how to be self-sufficient and independent. Some of the many things done at camp include: learning Cree; harvesting plants for medicines; fishing and snaring; hide tanning; preserving moose, deer, elk, and fish; woodworking and building dog sleds, toboggans, birch bark canoes, snowshoes, and paddles; dog sledding; and participating in the Sun Dance, Sweat Lodge, and Chicken Dance ceremonies. Camp offers an immersive experience in nehiyo culture and Lewis hopes that more culture camps become available to people, especially for those living in urban areas.

Check out the kâniyâsihk Culture Camps website: https://kaniyasihkculturecamps.com.

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

Teacher education and land-based learning- Sharon Langer

Instructor and K-6 Teacher Education Coordinator, Sharon Langer, talks about a land-based youth camp, coordinated by Qalipu First Nation, to which she takes her class of teacher education students each year. 

Instructor and K-6 Teacher Education Coordinator, Sharon Langer, talks about a land-based youth camp, coordinated by Qalipu First Nation, to which she takes her class of teacher education students each year. 

Land-based Youth Camp- Angela Brockway and Madison Bartlett

Angela Brockway, Education Outreach Officer, and Madison Bartlett, youth participant, discuss the annual land-based youth camp, coordinated by Qalipu First Nation, that takes place for all grade 5 students in western Newfoundland.

Angela Brockway, Education Outreach Officer, and Madison Bartlett, youth participant, discuss the annual land-based youth camp, coordinated by Qalipu First Nation, that takes place for all grade 5 students in western Newfoundland.

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Marilyn John

Marilyn John, a math tutor at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom, in Miawpukek First Nation, describes her work with students in grades 7,8 and 9. She talks about the community’s loss of language and the challenges of reviving Mi’Kmaw 80 years later. She concludes by advocating for the reintroduction of traditional crafts.   

Marilyn John, a math tutor at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom, in Miawpukek First Nation, describes her work with students in grades 7,8 and 9. She talks about the community’s loss of language and the challenges of reviving Mi’Kmaw 80 years later. She concludes by advocating for the reintroduction of traditional crafts. 

 

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Bailey Hansen

Bailey Hansen, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, describes how she augments grades 10 – 12 science, math, and physics with Indigenous materials, cultures, and ways of knowing. She also talks about the Coastal Explorers field school and the opportunities it affords to incorporate traditional knowledge and practices when interacting with […]

Bailey Hansen, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, describes how she augments grades 10 – 12 science, math, and physics with Indigenous materials, cultures, and ways of knowing. She also talks about the Coastal Explorers field school and the opportunities it affords to incorporate traditional knowledge and practices when interacting with marine and coastal ecosystem environments. In addition, she talks about her work with adult learners.