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Dancing Circles: Strong Hoop, Strong Spirit

Bringing hoop dancing to life through an instructional video.

The video, Dancing Circles: Strong Hoop, Strong Spirit (2003), is a Cree/English Instructional Resource on Hoop Dancing. The Hoop Dance is the accompanying Teacher Resource and both are aligned with Saskatchewan Learning curriculum. These resources are shared with permission from the writer, Anna-Leah King, Division Tech Media at the University of Saskatchewan, and the Greater Saskatoon Catholic School Division.

Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Mackenzie Delta Spring Goose Hunt

This is a program geared for youth aged 16 to 18 years of age.  The group sets up camp for four days with the help of 2 guides. During this time, the kids leanr how to prepare camp by cutting enough wood and also learn how to create snow blinds. 

This is a program geared for youth aged 16 to 18 years of age.  The group sets up camp for four days with the help of 2 guides. During this time, the kids leanr how to prepare camp by cutting enough wood and also learn how to create snow blinds. 

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Audrey Benoit

Audrey Benoit, Vice-Principal of Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation describes how they celebrate and support Indigenous culture in their school. 

Audrey Benoit, Vice-Principal of Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation describes how they celebrate and support Indigenous culture in their school. 

Simplifying Cree Language Lessons by Focusing on One Word

Cree words are packed with meaning and can be used as an entire language lesson.

Simon Bird is the Director of Education for the Lac La Ronge Indian Band and he shares his wealth of knowledge teaching Cree. He says, there are people in our communities who want to teach Cree and there are many more who want to learn it. He describes that you can teach an entire language lesson with one Cree word. For example, the word mistatim or misatim means big dog and refers to a horse. The concept of big dog exists within other Indigenous languages (Lakota, Dakota, Ojibway, Saulteaux, etc.) which shows how the horse was introduced to Indigenous people, and that dogs were part of their lives before horses came along. This language lesson brings in elements of history of Indigenous and non-Indigenous relationships, as well as, transportation and culture of peoples. In his discussion he gives an overview of a number of other Cree words that can be used in language lessons. Bird is a leader in his community and believes that if we study the language you will realize its significance and the roots it has in our culture and society – you will begin to appreciate who we are as people.

Resources: 

Think Indigenous – An Initiative Supporting Indigenous Knowledge

The Think Indigenous initiative inspires educators to think about education through an Indigenous knowledge lens.

Chris Scribe is the Executive Director and Board Chair of Think Indigenous, an initiative that seeks to support programs, innovations, and education that focus on Indigenous knowledge. Scribe believes that Indigenous knowledge is “an embodiment of life, it’s all levels of understanding relative to the area in which we live.” Scribe explains that what is needed now is for Indigenous people to create curriculums based on Indigenous knowledge that can be used within our education system. We need to invite our Knowledge Keepers into our classrooms so that traditional  knowledge is valued and honoured. As well, leaders in education need to make room for educators to try Indigenous methods and approaches to learning.

National Indigenous Youth Entrepreneurship Camp

The annual National Indigenous Youth Entrepreneurship Camp at First Nations University of Canada offers youth an opporunity to learn about business. 

Richard Missens from Pasqua First Nation is an Assistant Professor of Indigenous Business and Public Administration at the First Nations University of Canada. Missens has been offering the National Youth Entrepreneurship Camp for at least 9 years now, and has been introducing students from Grades 10-12 to entrepreneurial business, marketing, operations, and finance concepts. The camp provides students with an idea about on-campus living and studying, giving them a sense of post-secondary studies and institutions. The main objectives of the camp are to encourage young people to stay in school, to think about owning and managing their own business, and to think about how their Indigenous identities and values align with their business idea.

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Indigenous Graduation Grad Coach Program

Winnipeg School Division’s Aboriginal Graduation Coaches program provides multi-year support and guidance to students on their journey from Grade 9 to graduation.

In 2015, the Winnipeg School Division started an Aboriginal Graduation Coaches program which is an initiative that is focused on assisting Indigenous students to graduate high school. Winnipeg School Division’s Aboriginal Graduation Coaches program provides multi-year support and guidance to students on their journey from Grade 9 to graduation. The Aboriginal Graduation Coach Program focuses on the following six areas: Relationships & Mentoring, Transitions, Culture, Academics, Career Planning and Family Engagement. The focus of the Grad Coach is to increase Aboriginal graduation rates. Additional goals of the program include: Improve Aboriginal student attendance, course grades, and credit attainment; identify factors contributing to drop out rates; identify and create plans to overcome graduation barriers; improve transitions from junior high to high school, as well as to post-secondary/workforce; facilitate high school and post-secondary planning; and create a graduation team of support for the students. Link to a video about the program https://vimeo.com/225579583

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Kayla Stride

Kayla Stride, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, and member of Eastern Owl, describes how she uses drumming and song to re-ignite youth’s interest in their culture and strengthen Indigenous identity.  

Kayla Stride, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, and member of Eastern Owl, describes how she uses drumming and song to re-ignite youth’s interest in their culture and strengthen Indigenous identity.