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Mino Bimaadiziwin

Lakehead District School Board undertakes a summer camp program with 35-40 youth to teach the deeper meaning of living a good life.

Casey Leslie interviews Nicole Walter Rowan (Program Coordinator) & Anika Guthrie (Indigenous Education Resource Teacher) about the Mino Bidmaadiziwin program run by the Lakehead District School Board.

Mino Bidmaadiziwin, means living a good life and is a summer camp aimed at creating community amongst students preparing to enter new schools (Grade 6/ Grade 9/10). Camps are one or two weeks and engage with 35-40 youth from the Lakehead District School Board. The second week is a reach ahead credit for students transitioning from grade 8 to grade 9, to become familiar with more people and enter high school with a credit.

Indigenous Mentoring: Leadership roles – Sahtu Divisional Education Council

Angela Grandjambe describes some of the land-based education activities in the Sahtu region of the Northwest Territories.

Angela sits on many different boards. She has sat on the SDEC (Sahtu Divisional Education Council) for many years. Leaders help promote and ensure Traditional Knowledge and Practices are articulated in the school curriculum. Angela’s K’ahsho Got’ine background in positions, as such, help reinforce the Dene peoples values, systems, beliefs and practices.

Nusdeh Yoh Elementary – Culture and Language Revitalization

Nusdeh Yoh upholds the belief that all Aboriginal students are entitled to quality, holistic education that validates Indigenous cultures, histories, values and languages.

Nusdeh Yoh Elementary (SD57) is the Aboriginal Choice Program school located in Prince George. Nusdeh Yoh upholds the belief that all Aboriginal students are entitled to quality, holistic education that validates Indigenous cultures, histories, values and languages. The culture and language teacher, Edith Frederick, works to solidify Indigenous identity through land-based and language-focused teachings.

”Nusdeh Yoh,  “house of the future”, was chosen as our Aboriginal culture and language school name. The name selection process involved consultation with elders, parents, staff, and students. All partners desired a name that represented the hope inherent in this school to affect meaningful change in the lives of our children, families, and the greater community.

In the context of Nusdeh Yoh, student success is a holistic measure. We know that the emotional health and well being of our students is fundamental to their ability to access instruction and fully participate in their learning. Our focus on Restorative Practice is more than a philosophy of student discipline. It is an acknowledgement of the need for respectful relationships between all members of our school community and forms the foundation for a positive, welcoming school environment for all learners and participants.” –https://www.sd57.bc.ca/school/nyoh/About/Pages/default.aspx#/=

 

Kenanaw Program

The Kenanaw program was created by Elders as a way to develop teachers in the North.

The Kenanaw Learning Model is an education system that served Aboriginal people well for generations throughout time and history. It is about identity, a place of belonging, community history, roles and responsibilities of generations of families and the process of handing down knowledge in a larger context, the community that supports and nourishes the heart, mind, body and spirit. For Ininiwak, the Cree, the education system was transmitted through the families and communities as represented in the Kenanaw Learning Model.  https://www.ucn.ca/sites/academics/facultyeducation/programs/bacheloreducation/kenanowmodel/Pages/Kenanow-Model.aspx

Standing Tall Program

How an education program from New Zealand was adapted for use in two north end Winnipeg Schools to increase graduation rates and develop Métis identity.

The MMF’s vision for Standing Tall is to create, build and support healthy Métis families. The primary goal of this innovative community-based program is to have a positive impact on the self-esteem of Métis students while increasing participation of the Métis community in the public school system. It should be noted that this program was initiated by the Métis, yet it supports all students, especially Aboriginal students. The eight full time employees who work directly with program participants spend the majority of their time supporting students. They spend each day in the classroom, working alongside students, helping them succeed academically and socially. If students need support outside the classroom, they use the Cultural Learning Nest, a comfortable furnished room developed for the program.

http://www.louisrielinstitute.com/standing-tall-program.php

Neah Kee Papa Program

Stefan Gislason describes the Neah Kee Papa a mentor program for Métis and Indigenous fathers.

The Neah Kee Papa Program is a parenting enhancement program for current, new or soon-to-be Metis fathers. The ten-week program is designed to encourage and promote the role of fathers. The program assists through the continual development of parenting skills and offering referral services helps make men better fathers.

https://www.portageonline.com/local/qneah-kee-papaq-program-helps-men-become-better-fathers

Manitoba Inuit Association – Education Connections

With a variety of programs support for the Inuit community comes from the Manitoba Inuit Association.

Manitoba Inuit Association strives to assist the Inuit community across the province, offering a variety of services.

From its website:

 

  • ”To build a vibrant Manitoba Inuit community by connecting Inuit through activities and initiatives that sustain and build Inuit culture, values and language
  • Improve education, employment and training outcomes for Inuit in Manitoba
  • Develop research partnerships that help improve the health status for Inuit in Manitoba
  • Improve housing and food security for Inuit in Manitoba
  • Foster organizational capacity and innovation”

https://www.manitobainuit.ca/

Teaching Language and Culture in Tl’azt’en Nation

Margaret Mattess, Principal of Eugene Joseph Elementary discusses their approach to educating Indigenous youth.

This interview is the Principal of Eugene Joseph Elementary. Eugene Joseph Elementary is located in Tl’azt’en.

 

”Education is a continuous process that enables each Tl’azt’enne to reach her/his fullest potential. The roots of education are planted in families, cultural values and traditions.

Individual growth is dependent on a team of educators committed to the principles of motivation, encouragement, support and success.

At Eugene Joseph Elementary we are proud of our students, our parents and our community. We believe that all students, given the right support, can learn at a high level. We expect that all students will graduate and go on to some form of post-secondary education.” from the website http://tlaztennation.ca/eugene-joseph-elementary/

Woodland Cultural Centre Interview with Hailey Thomas Wilson

The Woodland Cultural Centre located in Brantford, Ontario near the Six Nations First Nation opened in 1972 at the old Mohawk Industrial Residential School. Its mandate is to provide cultural and educational activities and programs regarding Indigenous history, culture and contemporary issues. Its activities are divided into four departments: education, culture, language, arts and museum. […]

The Woodland Cultural Centre located in Brantford, Ontario near the Six Nations First Nation opened in 1972 at the old Mohawk Industrial Residential School. Its mandate is to provide cultural and educational activities and programs regarding Indigenous history, culture and contemporary issues. Its activities are divided into four departments: education, culture, language, arts and museum. It offers numerous educational programs including Indigenous languages, and houses an extensive collection of historical artifacts and Indigenous art in the museum. For more, visit the website at: http://woodlandculturalcentre.ca/.