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Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Mid Island Metis Nation – Cultural Teachings

President Joy Bremner discusses the Mid Island Metis Nation and their vision for cultural awareness in the Nanaimo Region.

President Joy Bremner discusses the Mid Island Metis Nation and their vision for cultural awareness in the Nanaimo Region.

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Jocelyn Formsma – Student of Life

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.

Stó:lō Nation Early Childhood Development Centre

Stó:lō Nation Early Childhood Development Centre Interview

A:lmélháwtxw “ Caring for our children” Early Education Centre provides programming in which offers a quality, holistic, traditional and safe environment for children birth to six years of age. Our programs are designed to offer children opportunities to explore the Stó:lō (people of the river) culture, language and traditions. Our environment fosters individual learning styles, exploration and self-acceptance. We provide early learning activities, which allow the children to learn through play. Our program environment blends the teachings of the Stó:lō people, the Halq’eméylem language and early education concepts. Our inclusive environment provides a harmonious balance in which fosters our Children’s natural ways of learning. For more information see: http://www.stolonation.bc.ca/

“Siyamtelot and Swelimeltexw” Hearing from our Elders

Siyamtelot is Okanagan and registered Stó:lō by marriage. Swelimeltexw is Stó:lō from Stsálles are Elders from Okanagan. They share their educational experience along with stories and teachings.

Siyamtelot is Okanagan and registered Stó:lō by marriage. Swelimeltexw is Stó:lō from Stsálles are Elders from Okanagan. They share their educational experience along with stories and teachings.

Indigenous Education and Student Achievement at Regina Public Schools

Supervisor of Indigenous Education, Sarah Longman, discusses the programs she oversees for Regina Public Schools.

As the Supervisor of Indigenous Education for Regina Public Schools, Sarah Longman oversees the academic standing of all self-declared Indigenous students in the division, to ensure they are successful in acquiring the credits needed to stay on track to graduate. When it is identified that a student may need extra support, there are a number of ways this support is provided. There is an Indigenous Advocate Teachers Program, whereby trained teachers of Indigenous backgrounds are placed in high schools to monitor the progress of self-declared students. If needed, the Indigenous Advocate teacher will work with the student to get them back on track by contacting the parents/guardians and teachers to help identify the barriers that may be preventing a student from succeeding.

Another source of support for students is an Elders in Residence Program. The Elders provide cultural understanding and cultural affirmation for Indigenous students and are overall positive role models. Elders bring their knowledge and expertise into the classroom and they may help non-Indigenous teaching staff to navigate sensitive topics such as residential schools. Elders may also connect with families by teaming up with the Indigenous Advocate teachers and provide support to the student and family that are experiencing challenges in school or at home.

There is an Elders Advisory Council that advises the Board of Trustees for Regina Public Schools. These Elders offer cultural understanding and cultural knowledge that guide the Trustees when they are making decisions that impact Indigenous students and the community. A lot of work is being done to bring culturally affirmative resources into the schools to develop contemporary representations of who Indigenous people are – with the aim to eradicate and replace negative stereotypes about Indigenous people.

Longman hopes that in the years to come, there will be more Indigenous educators, Indigenous doctors, Indigenous engineers, etc., taking the best of the Western world and finding ways to utilize technology to promote and sustain who they are as Indigenous people.

Akwesahsne Freedom School

First Nations led education in community

The Akwesahsne Freedom School was started in 1979 by parents in the Mohawk community that saw a need to preserve their ways and play an active role in the education of the nation starting with the children. They wanted their kids to be educated in the language, to be raised with ceremony and culture on the land of their ancestors without the influence and interference of the Western world. This approach has lead to results such as an increase in speakers of Mohawk language, rejuvenation of cultural strength and familiarity, and the continuance of inter-generational hands on learning.