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Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment

Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment explores the connection between art and life. It links Indigenous values, such as our connection to water and our protection of Mother Earth, to artistic representations. In this lesson, Sara Leah Hindy, a Mi’kmaw teacher, introduces the significance of place and explores textures in one of her […]

Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment explores the connection between art and life. It links Indigenous values, such as our connection to water and our protection of Mother Earth, to artistic representations. In this lesson, Sara Leah Hindy, a Mi’kmaw teacher, introduces the significance of place and explores textures in one of her favourite places, the beach. Using a rock collected on the beach, Marcus Gosse, a Mi’kmaw artist, then guides students on an artistic journey that weaves together a story of people and place through petroglyph-inspired rock art. Following the lesson, students are encouraged to explore their own special places and create a story that they would like to share through an art piece, uniquely theirs.

The complete lesson, Elements of Art – Textures in Our Environment, can be found in NCCIE’s Teaching Resource Centre at https://www.nccie.ca.

kâniyâsihk Culture Camps at Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation

Founder of kâniyâsihk Culture Camps, Kevin Lewis believes that land-based education is an important way for Cree and non-Indigenous people to (re)connect with Cree culture and identity.

Within the last two decades the kâniyâsihk Culture Camps at Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation have evolved from providing fall culture camps where participants took part in fishing and hide tanning to offering camps throughout all seasons and to anyone who wants to learn nehiyo (Cree) culture. Founder, Kevin Lewis explains that at kâniyâsihk Culture Camps participants take part in land-based learning that involves connecting with Elders, knowledge keepers, land keepers, medicine keepers, and berry pickers in their community. By sharing this wealth of knowledge with participants they begin to learn how to be self-sufficient and independent. Some of the many things done at camp include: learning Cree; harvesting plants for medicines; fishing and snaring; hide tanning; preserving moose, deer, elk, and fish; woodworking and building dog sleds, toboggans, birch bark canoes, snowshoes, and paddles; dog sledding; and participating in the Sun Dance, Sweat Lodge, and Chicken Dance ceremonies. Camp offers an immersive experience in nehiyo culture and Lewis hopes that more culture camps become available to people, especially for those living in urban areas.

Check out the kâniyâsihk Culture Camps website: https://kaniyasihkculturecamps.com.

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Kayla Stride

Kayla Stride, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, and member of Eastern Owl, describes how she uses drumming and song to re-ignite youth’s interest in their culture and strengthen Indigenous identity.  

Kayla Stride, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, and member of Eastern Owl, describes how she uses drumming and song to re-ignite youth’s interest in their culture and strengthen Indigenous identity.

 

Jocelyn Formsma – Student of Life

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

The Lafferty Family talks about Climate Change Impacts in the Sahtu

This is one in a set of three videos that talk about life along the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River) in the Sahtu. The topic of this video is how their environment is changing due to climate change.

Judy and Michel Lafferty talk about changes they and other Elders have observed due to climate change in their community and along the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River).

Special thanks to Judy and Michel Lafferty, and to others in their community, for their participation in this video.

As well, special thanks to:

  • Anne-Marie Jackson, NCCIE Videographer and Contributor
  • Christopher White, Promethean Heritage and Cultural Services, Video Editor
  • Andrée Cazabon, Productions Cazabon, Producer

This video and two others in this series are also part of Tracking Change: the Role of Local and Traditional Knowledge in Watershed Governance (trackingchange.ca), a project that includes listening to Indigenous peoples along the Mackenzie, Mekong, and Amazon Rivers to gather information about “long term (historic and current) patterns of social and ecological change and the interconnections between the health and dynamics of these river systems and that of river communities.” (source: www.trackingchange.ca/about)

Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Inuit educational and cultural institution

Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for “a place and time to become wise”), dedicated to providing Inuit youth with unique cultural and academic learning experiences that will allow them to develop the knowledge, skills and positive attitudes needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, the school gives urban Inuit a place to learn and prepare for other post-secondary or professional opportunities.

Mary Jane Fraser – Teaching Culture, History and Music: The Story Knowledge of Creation

To teach culture, history and music. To have access to what could be considered a privilege offered at the library, pow-wow grounds, school settings and at the band office, throughout the year. All community members can access the programs, in and around the City of Greater Sudbury. Mary also offers translation services as well. Mary […]

To teach culture, history and music. To have access to what could be considered a privilege offered at the library, pow-wow grounds, school settings and at the band office, throughout the year. All community members can access the programs, in and around the City of Greater Sudbury. Mary also offers translation services as well. Mary has a four year project offering story knowledge of Creation in partnership with Sudbury Symphony Proponent for Native content in libraries. Where there is a designated section.