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Teresa McGregor – Anishnawbek Ways of Knowing

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

Creating Cultural Space for Change

Lonny is Traditional Knowledge Holder working to fill in what were cultural blank spaces with Indigenous dialogue and narrative to create a meaningful cultural support to the clients and staff of the Rotary House. Lonny discusses how important it is to create cultural space for not only clients but also for front line workers dealing […]

Lonny is Traditional Knowledge Holder working to fill in what were cultural blank spaces with Indigenous dialogue and narrative to create a meaningful cultural support to the clients and staff of the Rotary House. Lonny discusses how important it is to create cultural space for not only clients but also for front line workers dealing in the field of mental health. Cultural space is necessary for people to experience what is meaningful for them and to start healing steps. He shares the five components required for Indigenous Education to be truly culturally based and grounded. 

Manitoba First Nations School System

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Manitoba First Nations School System (MFNSS) has been empowered to engage in Indigenous led education within the province.

Indigenous Graduation Grad Coach Program

Winnipeg School Division’s Aboriginal Graduation Coaches program provides multi-year support and guidance to students on their journey from Grade 9 to graduation.

In 2015, the Winnipeg School Division started an Aboriginal Graduation Coaches program which is an initiative that is focused on assisting Indigenous students to graduate high school. Winnipeg School Division’s Aboriginal Graduation Coaches program provides multi-year support and guidance to students on their journey from Grade 9 to graduation. The Aboriginal Graduation Coach Program focuses on the following six areas: Relationships & Mentoring, Transitions, Culture, Academics, Career Planning and Family Engagement. The focus of the Grad Coach is to increase Aboriginal graduation rates. Additional goals of the program include: Improve Aboriginal student attendance, course grades, and credit attainment; identify factors contributing to drop out rates; identify and create plans to overcome graduation barriers; improve transitions from junior high to high school, as well as to post-secondary/workforce; facilitate high school and post-secondary planning; and create a graduation team of support for the students. Link to a video about the program https://vimeo.com/225579583

Hailey Prince at the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, […]

Hailey Prince details the Nak’azdli Cultural Centre’s aims and initiatives of capturing and maintaining Dakelh traditional knowledge through methods of traditional knowledge transfer from Elders. The centre offers programs and classes that are focused on strengthening areas of traditional Dakelh knowledge. Classes include teaching Dakelh language; drums, rattles, snowshoes, shawls, vests, baskets making; as well, learning traditional ways of hunting, trapping, and fishing. Among being a place of teaching and learning, the Cultural Centre is a support system to the community through ensuring all those in need are cared for. A food hamper program is an example Hailey describes as one way the centre ensures those in need are cared for. All donations given to the centre are offered to families in need. Traditional knowledge retention and community support are just some of the areas in which Hailey Prince views the Nak’azdli centre as an area of success in Indigenous education.

E. Bob – Anishnawbek Wellness Teachings and Ceremony in Support of Inmates

Shared experiences when culture is used to advance corrections intentions. Here we see in what ways life is improved in a corrections environment. Ceremonies, smudging, sharing circles are all a part of sessions where

Program that is provided is for the inmate populations, it helps to provide life skills and coping strategies using Anishinawbek ways. “To have a better understanding of traditional knowledge.” Using circles as a teaching model, smudge to get ready for ceremony as well as a community pipe. Through group sharing, it provides the inmates with a safe place to talk about themselves and a break from being stuck in a incarceration setting.

Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home

Learning nēhiyawēwin through language acquisition methods that have informed the success of Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home, a program designed by Belinda Daniels and offered through READ Saskatoon. 

Belinda Daniels, onikanew (she who leads), runs a program through READ Saskatoon called, Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home. The program was born from the idea of learning language in a natural setting by enjoying food at the kitchen table, intergenerationally, with family members. The nēhiyawēwin (Cree) language classes are offered to anyone who wants to learn nēhiyawēwin in Saskatoon and encourages learners of all ages.

Language learners come to the class in a good way by introducing and positioning themselves in the community. The group offers tobacco to the language spirit and follows protocol by saying a prayer and smudging at the beginning of class. By learning Cree around the kitchen table, learners are able to learn food terminology in a coincidental way. Some terms and vocabulary include learning how to ask and say: Are you hungry?; I am hungry; What is this?; this is good; I would like some more; soup, bannock, pop, juice, milk, salad, pizza, etc.

In the classes, Daniels employs three language learning methods which are the direct method, task-based learning, and accelerated second language acquisition. Daniels hopes that her students become intrinsically motivated to bring language home and pass it on to the next generation of nēhiyawēwin language learners. By reclaiming language we work to restore identity, nationhood, and make gains towards sovereignty and self-determination.

Qaggiavuut Nunavut Performing Arts

Qaggiavuut is a Nunavut based non-profit performing arts organization that delivers a variety of performing arts training and produces Inuit performing arts; aimed at decolonizing and teaching Inuit traditional values through performing arts.

Qaggiavuut is a non-profit organization that aims to strengthen and advocate for Nunavut’s performing artists through professional arts training. They offer a variety of training programs, produce professional performances, and collaborate with other organizations to deliver programs. They are focused on creating arts partnerships, arts education, creating Inuit performing arts work, and developing an Inuit performing arts pedagogy. The objectives of their programs are to decolonize and teach Inuit traditional values through performing arts. Since April 2016 they have delivered programming to support more than 300 Inuit performing artists and 5000 Nunavut children and youth.

Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey Jenita’simk – Janean Marshall

Student Services Consultant, Janean Marshall, discusses her work bringing yoga and mindfulness into schools through the Jenita’simk program.

Student Services Consultant, Janean Marshall, discusses her work bringing yoga and mindfulness into schools through the Jenita’simk program.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.