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Art Petahtegoose – Thinking in Our Language and Our Role in Creation

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

An Elder, who is preparing Anishinaabe people to be responsible, knowledgeable about their culture, creation and to show us our own personal role in Creation.

Teresa McGregor – Anishnawbek Ways of Knowing

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

“Choices” is an alternative School and General Cultural Programming within Native Friendship Centre and Native Health centres. The goal of the program was to revitalize culture and incorporate Anishnawbek ways.

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Audrey Benoit

Audrey Benoit, Vice-Principal of Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation describes how they celebrate and support Indigenous culture in their school. 

Audrey Benoit, Vice-Principal of Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation describes how they celebrate and support Indigenous culture in their school. 

Think Indigenous – An Initiative Supporting Indigenous Knowledge

The Think Indigenous initiative inspires educators to think about education through an Indigenous knowledge lens.

Chris Scribe is the Executive Director and Board Chair of Think Indigenous, an initiative that seeks to support programs, innovations, and education that focus on Indigenous knowledge. Scribe believes that Indigenous knowledge is “an embodiment of life, it’s all levels of understanding relative to the area in which we live.” Scribe explains that what is needed now is for Indigenous people to create curriculums based on Indigenous knowledge that can be used within our education system. We need to invite our Knowledge Keepers into our classrooms so that traditional  knowledge is valued and honoured. As well, leaders in education need to make room for educators to try Indigenous methods and approaches to learning.

Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony

“Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony” (2018), authored by Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson, was inspired by Haida ceremonial practice and provides a model for learning for educators that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous. The authors encourage readers to consider the sk’ad’a (teaching) principles and what they might mean in the context of […]

“Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony” (2018), authored by Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson, was inspired by Haida ceremonial practice and provides a model for learning for educators that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous. The authors encourage readers to consider the sk’ad’a (teaching) principles and what they might mean in the context of education today and how these principles can be used in a local educational context. “Potlatch as Pedagogy” offers a lens from which to view teaching and learning from a different yet complimentary perspective to Western approaches to teaching and offers suggests for how educators can respectfully navigate those differences in education.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation

4 Seasons of Reconciliation is a multi-media teaching unit that promotes a renewed relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canadians, through transformative multi-media learning.

This educational initiative, developed for secondary, post-secondary and the workplace, incorporates teacher guides, slideshows, videos and films along with engaging online portals.

The reconciliation education resources are produced under the guidance of the ‘4 Seasons of Reconciliation Indigenous Advisory Circle.’  We work in a spirit of collaboration and co-creation with the Indigenous contributors featured throughout our resources and education units.

This resource is available for professional development use and educational purposes in workplaces and education sectors and aims to assist in meetings some of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action.

For more information, please visit: https://www.reconciliationeducation.ca/.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation was produced by Productions Cazabon in collaboration with First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv) and with support from FNUniv, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, and the National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education.

Round Table on Indigenous Student’s experiences in Post-Secondary education

A round table involving five Indigenous students was held at Trent University to discuss their experiences within post-secondary education. The students offered insights into the challenges getting to university and working within the post-secondary system for Indigenous youth. Some of the themes that emerged from the discussion included, the difficulties deciding on a discipline, the […]

A round table involving five Indigenous students was held at Trent University to discuss their experiences within post-secondary education. The students offered insights into the challenges getting to university and working within the post-secondary system for Indigenous youth. Some of the themes that emerged from the discussion included, the difficulties deciding on a discipline, the challenges in being admitted to post-secondary studies, the significance of a mentor and support within the university setting, and the importance of learning about culture and strengthening identity during their post-secondary educational experience.

The members of the round table were
• Bobby Henry, Haudenosaunee
• Papatsi Kotierk, Inuit
• Thomas Morningstar, Anishinaabeg
• Amy Shawanda , Anishiaabeg
• Coty Zachariah, Haudenosaunee
• Gabriel Maracle, Haudenosaunee (Moderator)

Special thanks to Aye Min Latt, Videographer.

Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom – Bailey Hansen

Bailey Hansen, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, describes how she augments grades 10 – 12 science, math, and physics with Indigenous materials, cultures, and ways of knowing. She also talks about the Coastal Explorers field school and the opportunities it affords to incorporate traditional knowledge and practices when interacting with […]

Bailey Hansen, a teacher at Se’t A’newey Kina’matino’Kuom in Miawpukek First Nation, describes how she augments grades 10 – 12 science, math, and physics with Indigenous materials, cultures, and ways of knowing. She also talks about the Coastal Explorers field school and the opportunities it affords to incorporate traditional knowledge and practices when interacting with marine and coastal ecosystem environments. In addition, she talks about her work with adult learners.

 

Youth For Reconciliation (YFR): Partnership between York Region District School Board and Pikangikum Education Authority

The Youth For Reconciliation (YFR) was a partnership that aimed to build connections, relationships and allyship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth and communities. Through experiential learning opportunities, Grade 9-12 students from Markham District High School, Bill Hogarth Secondary School and Eenchokay Birchstick School were brought together to share their perspectives while focusing on several school […]

The Youth For Reconciliation (YFR) was a partnership that aimed to build connections, relationships and allyship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth and communities. Through experiential learning opportunities, Grade 9-12 students from Markham District High School, Bill Hogarth Secondary School and Eenchokay Birchstick School were brought together to share their perspectives while focusing on several school subjects, particularly literacy, art and technology. This cross-curricular approach allowed the Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth to learn about each other’s lives and deepen their relationships with one another. Social media platforms were used to make personal connections and engage the students in various initiatives. In addition to students, some participants were parents, teachers, and other community members who felt strongly about sharing their experiences and what they knew about Indigenous peoples, cultures, languages, and practices. The YFR began in September 2017 and their work still continues today. For more information, check out their Instagram at @youthforreconciliation. Their website is currently under construction.

Innu Curriculum – John-Pierre Ashini

John-Pierre Ashini discusses his work with the Sheshatshiu Band Office Education Committee and the necessity of Innu curriculum in schools.

John-Pierre Ashini discusses his work with the Sheshatshiu Band Office Education Committee and the necessity of Innu curriculum in schools.