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Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Inuit educational and cultural institution

Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for “a place and time to become wise”), dedicated to providing Inuit youth with unique cultural and academic learning experiences that will allow them to develop the knowledge, skills and positive attitudes needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, the school gives urban Inuit a place to learn and prepare for other post-secondary or professional opportunities. 

To learn more, visit: https://www.nunavutsivuniksavut.ca/about-us.

Tungasuvvingat Inuit – Education Support Program

Inuit Education Support Program

Tungasuvvingat Inuit – Education Support Program
o The goal of the Education Support Program is to provide supports and resources to Inuit learners in the Ottawa, Ontario region. Included in programming are skills-based learning opportunities, social events, cultural sensitivity training if needed at post-secondary institutions and emotional guidance. They work with Indigenous centres on campus to provide the necessary supports and knowledge to encourage the success of Inuit students. Some programming within the organization has outdoor activities and interactions with the land in the surrounding area. The program supports Inuit students throughout the academic calendar year while they study at local post-secondary institutions. The education support programming offered is for all Inuit learners aged 18-30’s and their families in the Ottawa area.

Is there a website for more information? What is it?
o http://tungasuvvingatinuit.ca/

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – William Bernard Charlebois

Former student, William Bernard Charlebois, discusses what makes the Annapolis Valley First Nation School such a success in the community.

Former student, William Bernard Charlebois, discusses what makes the Annapolis Valley First Nation School such a success in the community.

Bringing the University to the Friendship Centre – Dr. Rochelle Côté

Dr. Rochelle Côté, Sociologist and Assistant Professor at Memorial University, discusses her work incorporating community-based learning into post-secondary education and the importance of holding university classes at local friendship centres.

Dr. Rochelle Côté, Sociologist and Assistant Professor at Memorial University, discusses her work incorporating community-based learning into post-secondary education and the importance of holding university classes at local friendship centres.

Indigenous Education and Student Achievement at Regina Public Schools

Supervisor of Indigenous Education, Sarah Longman, discusses the programs she oversees for Regina Public Schools.

As the Supervisor of Indigenous Education for Regina Public Schools, Sarah Longman oversees the academic standing of all self-declared Indigenous students in the division, to ensure they are successful in acquiring the credits needed to stay on track to graduate. When it is identified that a student may need extra support, there are a number of ways this support is provided. There is an Indigenous Advocate Teachers Program, whereby trained teachers of Indigenous backgrounds are placed in high schools to monitor the progress of self-declared students. If needed, the Indigenous Advocate teacher will work with the student to get them back on track by contacting the parents/guardians and teachers to help identify the barriers that may be preventing a student from succeeding.

Another source of support for students is an Elders in Residence Program. The Elders provide cultural understanding and cultural affirmation for Indigenous students and are overall positive role models. Elders bring their knowledge and expertise into the classroom and they may help non-Indigenous teaching staff to navigate sensitive topics such as residential schools. Elders may also connect with families by teaming up with the Indigenous Advocate teachers and provide support to the student and family that are experiencing challenges in school or at home.

There is an Elders Advisory Council that advises the Board of Trustees for Regina Public Schools. These Elders offer cultural understanding and cultural knowledge that guide the Trustees when they are making decisions that impact Indigenous students and the community. A lot of work is being done to bring culturally affirmative resources into the schools to develop contemporary representations of who Indigenous people are – with the aim to eradicate and replace negative stereotypes about Indigenous people.

Longman hopes that in the years to come, there will be more Indigenous educators, Indigenous doctors, Indigenous engineers, etc., taking the best of the Western world and finding ways to utilize technology to promote and sustain who they are as Indigenous people.

Indigenous Student Supports at Memorial University – Valeri Pilgrim

Valeri Pilgrim, Manager of the Aboriginal Resource Office at Memorial University, discusses the various programs and supports available to Indigenous students at Memorial University.

Valeri Pilgrim, Manager of the Aboriginal Resource Office at Memorial University, discusses the various programs and supports available to Indigenous students at Memorial University.

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – Debra Toney

Debra Toney, a former student at the Annapolis Valley First Nation School, talks about how the school is so effective in fostering student success.

Debra Toney, a former student at the Annapolis Valley First Nation School, talks about how the school is so effective in fostering student success.

Akwesahsne Freedom School

First Nations led education in community

The Akwesahsne Freedom School was started in 1979 by parents in the Mohawk community that saw a need to preserve their ways and play an active role in the education of the nation starting with the children. They wanted their kids to be educated in the language, to be raised with ceremony and culture on the land of their ancestors without the influence and interference of the Western world. This approach has lead to results such as an increase in speakers of Mohawk language, rejuvenation of cultural strength and familiarity, and the continuance of inter-generational hands on learning.

4R’s Youth Movement

Youth Empowerment Movement

4R’s is a national youth run and led organization that helps build the capacity of young people by providing meaningful places for them to develop and learn. They create opportunities and experiences in regions across the country to allow change makers the spaces to work on educational and community building initiatives, with the support of a network of national partners and adult allies.

Blair Beaucage – Getting to know Anishinaabe Education

Blair Beaucage an Indigenous teacher at Nbisiing Secondary School talks about his own desire to understand Indigenous education within the Anishinabe perspective. Blair of Nipissing First Nation talks about the importance of understanding traditional methods of knowledge by learning on and from the land.

Blair Beaucage an Indigenous teacher at Nbisiing Secondary School talks about his own desire to understand Indigenous education within the Anishinabe perspective. Blair of Nipissing First Nation talks about the importance of understanding traditional methods of knowledge by learning on and from the land.