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First Peoples House (McGill University)

Kakwiranó:ron Cook talks about the First Peoples House and McGill University’s initiatives to support Indigenous students in their academic studies and life on campus.

Since 1997, First Peoples House (FPH) has offered culturally appropriate support services for the university’s Indigenous learners. Often described as a “home away from home,” this dedicated space plays the role of community gathering place, healing, referral, support, tutoring, mentoring and educational guidance and even residence for several students. Some of the activities organized throughout the year include community soup and bannock dinners as well as mid-semester and annual events. In the summer, the FPH, in collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine, organizes the Eagle Spirit Camp, a three-day camp for potential future students aged 13 and 17, with the aim of encouraging them to realize their full educational and personal potential. Other events are organized in collaboration with other groups such as the Indigenous Student Alliance (ISA), a student interest group made up of Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and the Social Equity and Diversity Education’s Office (SEDE). For example, the Indigenous Awareness Week is held each year and culminates in a Pow Wow on campus in the fall semester, and the Indigenous Educational Series is organized, which takes place during the winter term and aims to raise awareness among the student population of Indigenous issues in Canada.

Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey – John Jerome Paul

John Jerome Paul discusses his work with Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey and his nearly 50 years working in Indigenous education.

John Jerome Paul discusses his work with Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey and his nearly 50 years working in Indigenous education.

Round Table on Indigenous Student’s experiences in Post-Secondary education

A round table involving five Indigenous students was held at Trent University to discuss their experiences within post-secondary education. The students offered insights into the challenges getting to university and working within the post-secondary system for Indigenous youth. Some of the themes that emerged from the discussion included, the difficulties deciding on a discipline, the […]

A round table involving five Indigenous students was held at Trent University to discuss their experiences within post-secondary education. The students offered insights into the challenges getting to university and working within the post-secondary system for Indigenous youth. Some of the themes that emerged from the discussion included, the difficulties deciding on a discipline, the challenges in being admitted to post-secondary studies, the significance of a mentor and support within the university setting, and the importance of learning about culture and strengthening identity during their post-secondary educational experience.

The members of the round table were
• Bobby Henry, Haudenosaunee
• Papatsi Kotierk, Inuit
• Thomas Morningstar, Anishinaabeg
• Amy Shawanda , Anishiaabeg
• Coty Zachariah, Haudenosaunee
• Gabriel Maracle, Haudenosaunee (Moderator)

Special thanks to Aye Min Latt, Videographer.

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – Diana MacLean

School director and teacher, Diana MacLean, discusses what makes Annapolis Valley First Nation School so successful in helping students achieve success.

School director and teacher, Diana MacLean, discusses what makes Annapolis Valley First Nation School so successful in helping students achieve success.

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – Duncan MacLean

Teacher Duncan MacLean discusses the importance of the Annapolis Valley First Nation School and the ways in which the school helps foster student success.

Teacher Duncan MacLean discusses the importance of the Annapolis Valley First Nation School and the ways in which the school helps foster student success.

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – Kyle Simon

Kyle Simon, a student at Annapolis Valley First Nation School, discusses the ways in which the school has helped him succeed.

Kyle Simon, a student at Annapolis Valley First Nation School, discusses the ways in which the school has helped him succeed.

Memorial University – Special Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Affairs – Catharyn Andersen

Catharyn Andersen, Memorial University’s Special Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Affairs, discusses her work at the university and the various ways that universities can better support Indigenous students and enhance their learning experience and success.

Catharyn Andersen, Memorial University’s Special Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Affairs, discusses her work at the university and the various ways that universities can better support Indigenous students and enhance their learning experience and success.

Annapolis Valley First Nation School – Goldy Simon

Goldy Simon discusses the positive impact that the Annapolis Valley First Nation School has had on her son.

Goldy Simon discusses the positive impact that the Annapolis Valley First Nation School has had on her son.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.

Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Inuit educational and cultural institution

Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for “a place and time to become wise”), dedicated to providing Inuit youth with unique cultural and academic learning experiences that will allow them to develop the knowledge, skills and positive attitudes needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, the school gives urban Inuit a place to learn and prepare for other post-secondary or professional opportunities.