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Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony

“Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony” (2018), authored by Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson, was inspired by Haida ceremonial practice and provides a model for learning for educators that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous. The authors encourage readers to consider the sk’ad’a (teaching) principles and what they might mean in the context of […]

“Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony” (2018), authored by Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson, was inspired by Haida ceremonial practice and provides a model for learning for educators that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous. The authors encourage readers to consider the sk’ad’a (teaching) principles and what they might mean in the context of education today and how these principles can be used in a local educational context. “Potlatch as Pedagogy” offers a lens from which to view teaching and learning from a different yet complimentary perspective to Western approaches to teaching and offers suggests for how educators can respectfully navigate those differences in education.

Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home

Learning nēhiyawēwin through language acquisition methods that have informed the success of Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home, a program designed by Belinda Daniels and offered through READ Saskatoon. 

Belinda Daniels, onikanew (she who leads), runs a program through READ Saskatoon called, Bringing nēhiyawēwin Home. The program was born from the idea of learning language in a natural setting by enjoying food at the kitchen table, intergenerationally, with family members. The nēhiyawēwin (Cree) language classes are offered to anyone who wants to learn nēhiyawēwin in Saskatoon and encourages learners of all ages.

Language learners come to the class in a good way by introducing and positioning themselves in the community. The group offers tobacco to the language spirit and follows protocol by saying a prayer and smudging at the beginning of class. By learning Cree around the kitchen table, learners are able to learn food terminology in a coincidental way. Some terms and vocabulary include learning how to ask and say: Are you hungry?; I am hungry; What is this?; this is good; I would like some more; soup, bannock, pop, juice, milk, salad, pizza, etc.

In the classes, Daniels employs three language learning methods which are the direct method, task-based learning, and accelerated second language acquisition. Daniels hopes that her students become intrinsically motivated to bring language home and pass it on to the next generation of nēhiyawēwin language learners. By reclaiming language we work to restore identity, nationhood, and make gains towards sovereignty and self-determination.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation

4 Seasons of Reconciliation is a multi-media teaching unit that promotes a renewed relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canadians, through transformative multi-media learning.

This educational initiative, developed for secondary, post-secondary and the workplace, incorporates teacher guides, slideshows, videos and films along with engaging online portals.

The reconciliation education resources are produced under the guidance of the ‘4 Seasons of Reconciliation Indigenous Advisory Circle.’  We work in a spirit of collaboration and co-creation with the Indigenous contributors featured throughout our resources and education units.

This resource is available for professional development use and educational purposes in workplaces and education sectors and aims to assist in meetings some of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action.

For more information, please visit: https://www.reconciliationeducation.ca/.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation was produced by Productions Cazabon in collaboration with First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv) and with support from FNUniv, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, and the National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education.

Round Table on Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the Academy with Elders and Educators at Trent University

This video is of a round table involving Indigenous Elders and educators held at Trent University on November 23, 2018. The topic of the round table was integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the academy. The panellists recognized substantial positive changes have been made at Trent such as the new mandatory half credit in Indigenous Studies for […]

This video is of a round table involving Indigenous Elders and educators held at Trent University on November 23, 2018. The topic of the round table was integrating Indigenous Knowledge into the academy. The panellists recognized substantial positive changes have been made at Trent such as the new mandatory half credit in Indigenous Studies for all students and the continued incorporation of Indigenous Knowledge in the Indigenous Studies PhD program. There was also recognition that more work needs to be done. Issues raised included incorporating more IK into the university as a whole which includes more land based learning, using Indigenous names for places and buildings, and more financial support for bringing in Indigenous elders to teach at the university.

The members of the round table were
• Doug Williams (Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg), Elder, Director of Studies Indigenous Studies PhD program, Trent University
• Barbra Wall (Potawatomi), Faculty department of Indigenous Studies, Trent University
• Dawn Lavell-Harvard, (Odawa), Director of First Peoples House of Learning, Trent University
• Coty Zachariah, (Haudenosaunee), Moderator of round table, Trent University Student

Special thanks to Aye Min Latt, Videographer.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.

Pinnguaq’s Te(a)ch Program – Nunavut

Pinnguaq’s Te(a)ch is a unique techonolgy where it aims to move children/teens from being consumers of technology to being creators of technology. Te(a)ch provides all of the material and curriculum to people involved to focus on building laptops to own and to tie in visual arts as well as tech safety. The program started in Pangnirtung and is now located in Iqaluit, NU.

Pinnguaq’s Te(a)ch is a unique techonolgy where it aims to move children/teens from being consumers of technology to being creators of technology. Te(a)ch provides all of the material and curriculum to people involved to focus on building laptops to own and to tie in visual arts as well as tech safety. The program started in Pangnirtung and is now located in Iqaluit, NU. The program has been running since 2012 and is dependent on project funding. Workshops/tech camps have also been in most Nunavut communities to deliver this program.

Tungasuvvingat Inuit – Education Support Program

Inuit Education Support Program

Tungasuvvingat Inuit – Education Support Program
o The goal of the Education Support Program is to provide supports and resources to Inuit learners in the Ottawa, Ontario region. Included in programming are skills-based learning opportunities, social events, cultural sensitivity training if needed at post-secondary institutions and emotional guidance. They work with Indigenous centres on campus to provide the necessary supports and knowledge to encourage the success of Inuit students. Some programming within the organization has outdoor activities and interactions with the land in the surrounding area. The program supports Inuit students throughout the academic calendar year while they study at local post-secondary institutions. The education support programming offered is for all Inuit learners aged 18-30’s and their families in the Ottawa area.

Is there a website for more information? What is it?
o http://tungasuvvingatinuit.ca/

Tłı̨chǫ Government

John B Zoe, Senior Advisor with the Tłı̨chǫ Government, talks about the importance of Tłı̨chǫ traditional knowledge, Land, Language and Culture. John also sits as the Chairperson of Dedats’eetsaa: the Tłı̨chǫ Research & Training Institute.

John B Zoe, Senior Advisor with the Tłı̨chǫ Government, talks about the importance of Tłı̨chǫ traditional knowledge, Land, Language and Culture. John also sits as the Chairperson of Dedats’eetsaa: the Tłı̨chǫ Research & Training Institute.

Canadian Roots Exchange

Reconciliation projects and exchanges

Canadian Roots Exchange (CRE) is an active youth organization with a mission to strengthen relationships between Indigenous & non-Indigenous youth by facilitating dialogue through leadership programs, exchanges, national gatherings, and workshops. They run national programming and develop teams in major cities across the country that work on reconciliation projects and bridging the gaps between our differing cultures.

All Canadians Can Gain Knowledge of the Truth of Indigenous History and Reality

Darlene Horseman is a professor at the Grande Prairie Regional College. She shares her perspective of the post secondary education system and process from her experience as a student to a professor. She speaks of what was taught in Indigenous studies and how it has changed from very vague information to very concise.

Darlene Horseman is a professor at the Grande Prairie Regional College. She shares her perspective of the post secondary education system and process from her experience as a student to a professor. She speaks of what was taught in Indigenous studies and how it has changed from very vague information to very concise.