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Think Indigenous – An Initiative Supporting Indigenous Knowledge

The Think Indigenous initiative inspires educators to think about education through an Indigenous knowledge lens.

Chris Scribe is the Executive Director and Board Chair of Think Indigenous, an initiative that seeks to support programs, innovations, and education that focus on Indigenous knowledge. Scribe believes that Indigenous knowledge is “an embodiment of life, it’s all levels of understanding relative to the area in which we live.” Scribe explains that what is needed now is for Indigenous people to create curriculums based on Indigenous knowledge that can be used within our education system. We need to invite our Knowledge Keepers into our classrooms so that traditional  knowledge is valued and honoured. As well, leaders in education need to make room for educators to try Indigenous methods and approaches to learning.

Susep Soulle – Knowledge holder – Secwepemc language speaker

Only 18 years old, Susep is considered to be one of the youngest fluent speakers of his traditional language.

This interview is done with one of the youngest fluent speakers of the Secwepemc language. He is from the small town of Chase, BC. Susep is an assistant teacher at the renowned “Chief Atahm” school which is located on the Adams Lake Band. Only 18 years old Susep takes us on his short journey of his life and shares with us some of his thoughts on language, language revitalization and culture.

Teacher education and land-based learning- Sharon Langer

Instructor and K-6 Teacher Education Coordinator, Sharon Langer, talks about a land-based youth camp, coordinated by Qalipu First Nation, to which she takes her class of teacher education students each year. 

Instructor and K-6 Teacher Education Coordinator, Sharon Langer, talks about a land-based youth camp, coordinated by Qalipu First Nation, to which she takes her class of teacher education students each year. 

Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony

“Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony” (2018), authored by Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson, was inspired by Haida ceremonial practice and provides a model for learning for educators that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous. The authors encourage readers to consider the sk’ad’a (teaching) principles and what they might mean in the context of […]

“Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning Through Ceremony” (2018), authored by Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson, was inspired by Haida ceremonial practice and provides a model for learning for educators that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous. The authors encourage readers to consider the sk’ad’a (teaching) principles and what they might mean in the context of education today and how these principles can be used in a local educational context. “Potlatch as Pedagogy” offers a lens from which to view teaching and learning from a different yet complimentary perspective to Western approaches to teaching and offers suggests for how educators can respectfully navigate those differences in education.

Angela Grandjambe

Angela sits on many different boards. She sits as the DEA for many years. Angela holds knowledge of our community that benefits our people.

Angela sits on many different boards. She sits as the DEA for many years. Angela holds knowledge of our community that benefits our people.

Jocelyn Formsma – Student of Life

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

Examples of formal and informal Indigenous Education from a ‘student of life’ who describes the importance of language and land-based learning.

E. Bob – Anishnawbek Wellness Teachings and Ceremony in Support of Inmates

This program utilizes traditional knowledge and ceremony to advance the intentions of corrections institutions.

This program offers inmate populations an opportunity to learn life skills and coping strategies through Anishinawbek wellness teachings and ceremony. The program hopes that inmates will have a better understanding of traditional knowledge as they practice sharing in circles, smudge to get ready for ceremony, as well as, engaging in a community pipe. Group sharing provides the inmates with a safe place to talk about themselves and offers a break from being stuck in an incarceration setting.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation

4 Seasons of Reconciliation is a multi-media teaching unit that promotes a renewed relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canadians.

This educational initiative, developed for secondary, post-secondary and the workplace, incorporates teacher guides, slideshows, videos and films along with engaging online portals.

The reconciliation education resources are produced under the guidance of the ‘4 Seasons of Reconciliation Indigenous Advisory Circle.’  We work in a spirit of collaboration and co-creation with the Indigenous contributors featured throughout our resources and education units.

This resource is available for professional development use and educational purposes in workplaces and education sectors and aims to assist in meetings some of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action.

For more information, please visit: https://www.reconciliationeducation.ca/.

4 Seasons of Reconciliation was produced by Productions Cazabon in collaboration with First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv) and with support from FNUniv, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, and the National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education.

First Nations Technical Institute

First Nations owned and operated post-secondary education institution.

First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI) is a First Nation owned and governed educational institute specializing in applying Indigenous knowledge to both formal and informal learning experiences. Many of our programs and services are delivered at locations across Ontario. For more than 30 years, FNTI has played an essential role in making post-secondary education relevant for Indigenous students and communities. We work closely with our partners to build unique, cutting-edge Indigenous learning experiences and environments.